The Key To Running A Successful Virtual Assistant Business

the key to running a successful virtual assistant business

Have you ever said that “every business owner is my target market”?

As a virtual assistant coach I’ve heard it a lot and when I do, I cringe.

It may seem that if you cast a wide net you’re likely to catch more fish, but the opposite is true.  When you market your services to everyone something very unfortunate happens.  Your ideal client, that client that you just adore working with for all the right reasons…

Can’t find you.

When you market to everyone your marketing is generic. Your message lacks something crucial.  The ability to laser in on specific problems that your ideal client is experiencing.

The right people won’t be able to say “this is EXACTLY the problem I’m having”.

Narrowing down your focus (read: the services your offer) allows you to have a message that resonates with those who you want to work with.

Example of a narrow focus

You’re a VA that specializes in social media marketing and you support Wellness Coaches who know they need to be active on social media but hate how time-consuming it is.

Example of a not so narrow focus

You’re a virtual assistant that supports entrepreneurs with their project management and customer service needs by utilizing software such as MicroSoft Suite and WordPress.

So this begs the question, how DO I focus my message and attract my ideal clients?

The answer is, complete your ideal client profile.

Knowing who your ideal client is is so important that I consider it to be the crux of your business.

If you can’t walk a mile in your customer’s shoes, you shouldn’t be selling to them.

Walking in your customer’s shoes means you’re in their head. You know what it’s like to be them.  You understand them can help them in a way that no one else can.

Getting clear about your ideal client is the key to having a successful virtual assistant business.  Because all of your marketing efforts will be “speaking” to this person, your message will be communicating your value which by default will make your services less about your price and more about how you can help them.

Your prospects will often self-select themselves as ready to buy your services BEFORE you even have an introductory call.

Bake on that for a second. Your website is a 24 hour a day, 7 day a week stand in for you and if you get your messaging right you can snag clients while you sleep.

Imagine waking up to an email that reads:

“Hi! I just found your website and I am in desperate need of your help and would love to speak to you ASAP about how we can work together”.

A simple way to begin creating your ideal client profile is by asking yourself these questions:

  • What is my ideal client struggling with (be specific!)
  • How are my services the exact thing you need right now and forever more?
  • What does life look like for them now that you’re in their life? Paint me a picture darlin!
  • What action should they take to find out more?

Now, start putting together your ideal client profile and clarifying your message! Leave me a comment below and let me know who your ideal client is and the services you want most to focus on and I’ll respond with some ideas for you.

Have you figured out who your ideal client is? What is holding you back from figuring out who you should work with? Let me know in the comments. 

Rock on,

Reese

22 Responses to The Key To Running A Successful Virtual Assistant Business

  1. I needed this. I’m new to the VA world and reading this absolutely helped me get more realistic and practical ideas to help me with what I’m getting myself into. Thanks a lot!

    Here’s my newly created site if you have time to visit:
    http://vabyjoannamacatiog.wixsite.com/joannathefilipinova/

  2. Claire Smith says:

    Hi Reese

    Another great article. I’m just in the process of setting up and drafting content for my website. I know that my dream clients would be in areas that tie in with my interests (travel, interior design, yoga/wellness) as I’d like to work with people whose work is something I’m interested in (the opposite to what I’ve been doing for the past 11 years!). Clearly those areas are quite different – do you have any ideas of some kind of theme that could tie them together?

    Thanks in advance.
    Claire

  3. Chelsea says:

    Reese – I have been stuck on my client avatar for months. The example in your article suddenly made it crystal clear. Thanks so much! I’ll be re-working my messaging to reflect it.

  4. Bernice says:

    Hey Reese,

    How did I miss this post?! I’ve been struggling with this topic for a while. My client roster is quite diverse and even though I like each one of them, I’m not getting anywhere. I definitely have to work on narrowing down my ideal client.

    Thanks,
    Bernice

  5. Hatice says:

    Hi Reese,

    Your website is indeed exciting. I’ve been thinking about moving into being a VA for a while now. I am currently working as an executive assistant in a big international company but as I want to move in another country I would like to start processing VA and go live where I want… And your website is encouraging. I am experienced in dealing with high level executive admin duties, but I am as well a keen reader and social media user, so I would rather move to research, fact checks, social media and blog management support… I am not planning having a website at this stage but I would appreciate any suggestions that you may have.

    Thanks

  6. Tamara Anthony says:

    I plan on starting a VA business and I want my clients to be Doctors or people in the medical field. Do you think I need to be more specific and narrow it down more?

  7. Karen says:

    Hi Reese, this is fantastic advice! And oh so true, a client avatar helps keep you focused and makes it easier to target your ideal market.
    Thanks for always sharing up-to-date and usable tips!

  8. I agree and love this article. I know I still have some work to do here both is further defining my ideal client and expressing it on my site, but I am much better at it than I used to be! I would welcome comments on my site that might help me bring it into better focus.

    • Reese says:

      Hi Wendy! Congrats on taking the leap to become a VA. I would say one thing that stands out on your site is the different set of fonts/colors. It makes it hard on the eyes. Also your home page has blog comments enabled. I would remove that. When trying to get people to opt into your newsletter you have to give them a really good reason why as people are busy and distracted and you’re opt-in offer needs to be enticing. So if you can’t think of an enticing offer at the moment, ditch the newsletter for now and focus on your site content and design and then circle back to an opt-in offer like a newsletter.

  9. Hi Reese, I have definitely been working on getting my message just right on my website and have known who my ideal client is for a while now. I’ve been working with a local gym for several months and have worked with a personal trainer, and sports enthusiast for several months. I find that I really enjoy working with health & wellness and fitness professionals just doing email marketing and writing.

    One of my client consults on yesterday was with a financial services company to talk about how I could help them. And they just didn’t seem to get me like the group of people that I enjoy working with. Even if they would have said yes, I didn’t feel like we would have been a good fit for each other.

  10. Barbara says:

    Thank you so much for sharing! Great advice

  11. Reese, this is great! I like that you point out that if we can’t walk a mile in our customers’ shoes, we shouldn’t be working with them. That’s a great analogy to get to know our customers on a deeper level.

    • Reese says:

      A to the MEN, Sheryl! I love that quote. It’s powerful because it’s simple. Great hearing from you! Sending you love from Israel. Shabbat Shalom.

  12. I have been thinking about this a lot lately. I have been saying that my ideal clients are female solo entrepreneurs and my services are pretty general but I’m guessing that’s not narrow enough? I know i can’t market to everyone but I can’t shake the feeling that I could be missing out on income if I narrow things down.

    • Reese says:

      Jocelyn, what you’re afraid of is very common but I want to ease your mind. The more narrow you are the more folks will find you because you’ll be the go to person for a specific audience. Think about it. How many clients do you really need? 5? 10? A VA in my community focuses on the construction industry (only) and another is a VA that focuses entirely on bankruptcy attorneys. Another sticks to the professional speaking industry. 2 out of 3 of them (only because I haven’t checked in on 1 to see how biz in) have businesses that are BOOMING.

  13. Hi just reading through your informative tips. I am a new Va and just set up my website. Im trying to offer my services to local business and for everyday people needing help with admin etc. Could you help with an overhaul of my website? Would appreciate a second opinion.
    Regards
    Deborah Astbury

    • Reese says:

      Hi Deborah! Congrats on becoming a VA, how exciting! Congrats on getting a site up! I’d tell you that the purple font is hard to read and the rectangle picture on the home page is distracting. I’d get rid of it and just leave the picture of the laptop on the table. I’d also encourage you to use one or two fonts. A cursive font is great for accents but not for your navigation bar. Good luck!

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